Abandonment or Acceptance?

Abandonment or Acceptance?

 

It is important to comprehend, somehow, that seeking God, awakening or enlightenment is not abandonment. This is a great mistake. It is not, “Christianity gives me nothing, I’ll try Buddhism,” or declaring Agnosticism or Atheism because answers cannot be found. It is not walking out of your life and racing to the Himalayas clutching mushrooms to sit in a cave for 30 years chanting mantras. Abandonment is the restless mind jumping from one fix to the next searching for something it will never find.
 
Altered states of consciousness via mushrooms or anything else remove you from the humdrum and can send you into indescribable ecstasy, yes, but this are states which pass, and you have to return to Earth’s atmosphere with an inelegant bump. The divine point of consciousness that you are, through the perturbed mind, tries to run away from itself like an animal with a wounded tail. God, awakening or enlightenment is found by Acceptance by which is meant, Surrender, with your entire body/mind.
 
Admitting defeat, slumped and non-plussed is a shining, divine gateway, believe it or not. Rumi, in his sublime poetic line: ‘Out beyond ideas of wrongdoing and rightdoing there is a field. I’ll meet you there,’ alludes to what lies behind the slumped, non-plussedness. It sounds profoundly romantic, inspirational and offers hope to the over-worked, exhausted, troubled mind; how it lifts us to think of our sacred beautiful lover whom we can meet in a silent place where all is transcended! Be the lover as expressed in exquisite eroticism or as God.
 
It is poetic licence, of course, that Rumi uses the future tense (I assume this is also true in the original Persian), but in actuality, the field he speaks of is not out there, but here. And there is no need to meet in the future (“I’ll meet you there”) because it is now. There is no future or “out there” – it is all perceived as one great continuum.
 
Another gateway might be to observe gently what happens when you read Rumi’s line – you stop to contemplate and feel what his words ‘do’ to you. They lift your heart; you press the pause button on your life; you contemplate, and joy arises as your eyes shine. But look to see what your heart has lifted from – there is an energetic ground – a bedrock – which is not affected by the words. This pulsating silence upon which your entire being rests, observing without eyes or other senses, is the field to which Rumi refers. It has nothing to do with mind. It is the essence of who you truly are – God, /pulsating/vibrating/ loving/serving your mind’s every mortal whim.